Featured Article

Preface

Author: Sonia Howell (University of Notre Dame) and Matthew Wilkens (University of Notre Dame)

Comments

In “The Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0” (2009), the authors define the Digital Humanities as,

an array of convergent practices that explore a universe in which: a) print is no longer the exclusive or the normative medium in which knowledge is produced and/or disseminated; instead, print finds itself absorbed into new, multimedia configurations; and b) digital tools, techniques, and media have altered the production and dissemination of knowledge in the arts, human and social sciences.[1]

Read More

The Emergence of the Digital Humanities in Ireland

Author: James O’Sullivan (Penn State University), Órla Murphy (University College Cork), Shawn Day (University College Cork)

Comments

“Digital Humanities is not some airy Lyceum. It is a series of concrete instantiations involving money, students, funding agencies, big schools, little schools, programs, curricula, old guards, new guards, gatekeepers, and prestige. It might be more than these things, but it cannot not be these things.”[1]

Read More

An Digitiú agus na Daonnachtaí in Éirinn

Author: Pádraig Ó Macháin (University College Cork)

Comments

Is féidir sainmhíniú fíorshimplí a dhéanamh ar an digitiú, is é sin, eolas a chruthú i bhfoirm leictreonach nó a aistriú go dtí an fhoirm sin. Chomh fada siar le 1993, léirigh an Dr. Peter Robinson na prionsabail bhunaidh phraiticiúla a bhain le foinsí scoláiriúla a chur i riocht leictreonach.[1]

Read More

Developing Digital Resources for the Exploration of Medieval Ireland: The Monastic Ireland Project

Author: Niamh NicGhabhann (University of Limerick)

Comments

I. Introduction

The aim of this paper is to discuss some of the opportunities and challenges around the creation of digital resources for the study of medieval Irish architectural heritage and monastic culture more generally. In particular, it explores the ways in which digital resources must respond to the nature of source material for this subject, given variation in place and family names, as well as the creation of an interface that will be usable by the different types of groups involved in research on medieval Irish architectural history and heritage, including scholars and researchers, tourists, and local heritage groups. This paper outlines the initial development stages of the Monastic Ireland

Read More

Ogham in 3D: Digitizing a Unique Aspect of Ireland’s Cultural Heritage

Author: Nora White (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies)

Comments

Figure 1. Emlagh East Ogham stone, Dingle Peninsula

I. Introduction

Ogham stones are among Ireland’s most remarkable national treasures. These perpendicular cut stones bear inscriptions in the uniquely Irish Ogham alphabet, using a system of notches and horizontal or diagonal lines/scores to represent the sounds of an early form of the Irish language. The stones are inscribed with the names of prominent people and sometimes tribal affiliation. These inscriptions constitute the earliest recorded form of Irish, and, as our earliest written records—dating back at least as far as the fifth century A.D.—they are a significant resource for historians, as well as linguists and archaeologists.[1]

Read More

Requirements and National Digital Infrastructures: Digital Preservation in the Humanities

Author: Sharon Webb (Digital Repository of Ireland)

Comments

We historians, literary scholars, linguists, philosophers, musicians, and others, as practitioners of humanities, have embraced the use of digital technology in all aspects of our work. We use online digital infrastructures to access the vast majority of our sources, we use bibliographic management systems to automate the referencing and organization of source material, we use spreadsheets and databases to structure, analyze, and visualize our data, and we use powerful text editors to typeset our work which, in many ways, support “rapid prototyping” of scholarly texts. We also disseminate our research online through tweets, blogs, and personal and academic websites. In a sense these new tools have seeped into the culture of humanities research and have become part of what we do—they are immersed in the culture (of the humanities) and extend the humanities toolkit.[1]

Read More

Visualizing a Spatial Archive: GIS, Digital Humanities, and Relational Space

Author: Ronan Foley (Maynooth University) and Rachel Murphy (University College Cork)

Comments

Introduction: A Spatial Approach to the Digital Humanities

Geography matters! In any reading of literature or history, paper or digital, our imaginations are often invoked through a spatial sense. In a country where the importance of dinnseanchas, or “place lore,” remains a significant contemporary component, a reading of place regularly features across the multiple strands of Irish Studies.[1]

Read More

Computing Ireland’s Place in the Nineteenth-Century Novel: A Macroanalysis

Author: Matthew L. Jockers (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

Comments

Introduction[1]

Right now, in 2015, we are in the early stages of articulating, or defining, a new type of literary criticism. It, whatever it may be, goes by various names. For describing this kind of work, many have latched on to the recently minted, newly popular, and annoyingly imprecise term “Digital Humanities.” To my mind, this thing that we have come to call “Digital Humanities” is neither a method nor a discipline, and though it traces its roots to matters of a deeply textual nature, it is not a term uniquely applied to work in literary studies. For this and many other reasons, I generally find the term “Digital Humanities” useless; it defines nothing in particular, and it certainly does not define or describe the kind of literary research in which I am engaged. There have been any number of thoughtful essays written on this subject of defining the Digital Humanities, and Matthew Kirshenbaum’s “What is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” is one of the most recent and most informative.[2]

Read More

English Bards and Unknown Reviewers: A Stylometric Analysis of Thomas Moore and the Christabel Review

Author: Francesca Benatti (Open University) and Justin Tonra (National University of Ireland, Galway)

Comments

Introduction

Fraught relations between authors and critics are a commonplace of literary history. The particular case that we discuss in this article, a negative review of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816), has an additional point of interest beyond the usual mixture of amusement and resentment that surrounds a critical rebuke: the authorship of the review remains, to this day, uncertain. The purpose of this article is to investigate the possible candidacy of Thomas Moore as the author of the provocative review. It seeks to solve a puzzle of almost two hundred years and in the process clear a valuable scholarly path in Irish Studies, in the field of Romanticism, and in our understanding of Moore’s role in a prominent literary controversy of the age.…

Read More

Networking a Scholarly Edition—Networking Ulysses as a Digital Text and Research Site

Author: Hans Walter Gabler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Comments

Assuming a graded distinction between information sites, knowledge sites, and research sites,[1] what is it that specifically marks out the digital research site? The types of site are all repositories of content. The content they comprise and harvest is substantial knowledge. The research site in particular is structured by nodes for content enrichment. Assembling, recording, and holding knowledge, the research site serves simultaneously to modify, revise, and increase it. In research practice, this happens in a man-to-machine query:response interaction. Utilizing the dynamic potential of the digital medium, the digital research site brings to the fore the dynamic process nature of knowledge. The constant dialogic negotiation of its content and substance is what renders the digital site a research site.…

Read More

Current Articles

Preface

Author: Sonia Howell (University of Notre Dame) and Matthew Wilkens (University of Notre Dame)

Comments

In “The Digital Humanities Manifesto 2.0” (2009), the authors define the Digital Humanities as,

an array of convergent practices that explore a universe in which: a) print is no longer the exclusive or the normative medium in which knowledge is produced and/or disseminated; instead, print finds itself absorbed into new, multimedia configurations; and b) digital tools, techniques, and media have altered the production and dissemination of knowledge in the arts, human and social sciences.[1]

Read More

The Emergence of the Digital Humanities in Ireland

Author: James O’Sullivan (Penn State University), Órla Murphy (University College Cork), Shawn Day (University College Cork)

Comments

“Digital Humanities is not some airy Lyceum. It is a series of concrete instantiations involving money, students, funding agencies, big schools, little schools, programs, curricula, old guards, new guards, gatekeepers, and prestige. It might be more than these things, but it cannot not be these things.”[1]

Read More

An Digitiú agus na Daonnachtaí in Éirinn

Author: Pádraig Ó Macháin (University College Cork)

Comments

Is féidir sainmhíniú fíorshimplí a dhéanamh ar an digitiú, is é sin, eolas a chruthú i bhfoirm leictreonach nó a aistriú go dtí an fhoirm sin. Chomh fada siar le 1993, léirigh an Dr. Peter Robinson na prionsabail bhunaidh phraiticiúla a bhain le foinsí scoláiriúla a chur i riocht leictreonach.[1]

Read More

Developing Digital Resources for the Exploration of Medieval Ireland: The Monastic Ireland Project

Author: Niamh NicGhabhann (University of Limerick)

Comments

I. Introduction

The aim of this paper is to discuss some of the opportunities and challenges around the creation of digital resources for the study of medieval Irish architectural heritage and monastic culture more generally. In particular, it explores the ways in which digital resources must respond to the nature of source material for this subject, given variation in place and family names, as well as the creation of an interface that will be usable by the different types of groups involved in research on medieval Irish architectural history and heritage, including scholars and researchers, tourists, and local heritage groups. This paper outlines the initial development stages of the Monastic Ireland

Read More

Ogham in 3D: Digitizing a Unique Aspect of Ireland’s Cultural Heritage

Author: Nora White (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies)

Comments

Figure 1. Emlagh East Ogham stone, Dingle Peninsula

I. Introduction

Ogham stones are among Ireland’s most remarkable national treasures. These perpendicular cut stones bear inscriptions in the uniquely Irish Ogham alphabet, using a system of notches and horizontal or diagonal lines/scores to represent the sounds of an early form of the Irish language. The stones are inscribed with the names of prominent people and sometimes tribal affiliation. These inscriptions constitute the earliest recorded form of Irish, and, as our earliest written records—dating back at least as far as the fifth century A.D.—they are a significant resource for historians, as well as linguists and archaeologists.[1]

Read More

Requirements and National Digital Infrastructures: Digital Preservation in the Humanities

Author: Sharon Webb (Digital Repository of Ireland)

Comments

We historians, literary scholars, linguists, philosophers, musicians, and others, as practitioners of humanities, have embraced the use of digital technology in all aspects of our work. We use online digital infrastructures to access the vast majority of our sources, we use bibliographic management systems to automate the referencing and organization of source material, we use spreadsheets and databases to structure, analyze, and visualize our data, and we use powerful text editors to typeset our work which, in many ways, support “rapid prototyping” of scholarly texts. We also disseminate our research online through tweets, blogs, and personal and academic websites. In a sense these new tools have seeped into the culture of humanities research and have become part of what we do—they are immersed in the culture (of the humanities) and extend the humanities toolkit.[1]

Read More

Visualizing a Spatial Archive: GIS, Digital Humanities, and Relational Space

Author: Ronan Foley (Maynooth University) and Rachel Murphy (University College Cork)

Comments

Introduction: A Spatial Approach to the Digital Humanities

Geography matters! In any reading of literature or history, paper or digital, our imaginations are often invoked through a spatial sense. In a country where the importance of dinnseanchas, or “place lore,” remains a significant contemporary component, a reading of place regularly features across the multiple strands of Irish Studies.[1]

Read More

Computing Ireland’s Place in the Nineteenth-Century Novel: A Macroanalysis

Author: Matthew L. Jockers (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

Comments

Introduction[1]

Right now, in 2015, we are in the early stages of articulating, or defining, a new type of literary criticism. It, whatever it may be, goes by various names. For describing this kind of work, many have latched on to the recently minted, newly popular, and annoyingly imprecise term “Digital Humanities.” To my mind, this thing that we have come to call “Digital Humanities” is neither a method nor a discipline, and though it traces its roots to matters of a deeply textual nature, it is not a term uniquely applied to work in literary studies. For this and many other reasons, I generally find the term “Digital Humanities” useless; it defines nothing in particular, and it certainly does not define or describe the kind of literary research in which I am engaged. There have been any number of thoughtful essays written on this subject of defining the Digital Humanities, and Matthew Kirshenbaum’s “What is Digital Humanities and What’s It Doing in English Departments?” is one of the most recent and most informative.[2]

Read More

English Bards and Unknown Reviewers: A Stylometric Analysis of Thomas Moore and the Christabel Review

Author: Francesca Benatti (Open University) and Justin Tonra (National University of Ireland, Galway)

Comments

Introduction

Fraught relations between authors and critics are a commonplace of literary history. The particular case that we discuss in this article, a negative review of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel (1816), has an additional point of interest beyond the usual mixture of amusement and resentment that surrounds a critical rebuke: the authorship of the review remains, to this day, uncertain. The purpose of this article is to investigate the possible candidacy of Thomas Moore as the author of the provocative review. It seeks to solve a puzzle of almost two hundred years and in the process clear a valuable scholarly path in Irish Studies, in the field of Romanticism, and in our understanding of Moore’s role in a prominent literary controversy of the age.…

Read More

Networking a Scholarly Edition—Networking Ulysses as a Digital Text and Research Site

Author: Hans Walter Gabler (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München)

Comments

Assuming a graded distinction between information sites, knowledge sites, and research sites,[1] what is it that specifically marks out the digital research site? The types of site are all repositories of content. The content they comprise and harvest is substantial knowledge. The research site in particular is structured by nodes for content enrichment. Assembling, recording, and holding knowledge, the research site serves simultaneously to modify, revise, and increase it. In research practice, this happens in a man-to-machine query:response interaction. Utilizing the dynamic potential of the digital medium, the digital research site brings to the fore the dynamic process nature of knowledge. The constant dialogic negotiation of its content and substance is what renders the digital site a research site.…

Read More