Articles

Dublin Memorialized

Author: Siobhán Purcell (National Unversity of Ireland, Galway)

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St. Patrick's Day

Thomas McGonigle. St. Patrick’s Day: another day in Dublin. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2016, 244 pp.

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Fighting Empire at Home

Author: Gabriel Doherty (University College Cork)

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Townend The Road To Home Rule C

Paul Townend. The Road to Home Rule: Anti-Imperialism and the Irish National Movement. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, 2017, xxii + 312 pp.

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Georgian Dublin Uncovered

Author: Gillian O’Brien (Liverpool John Moores University)

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Georgian Dublin

Diarmuid Ó Gráda. Georgian Dublin: The Forces That Shaped the City. Cork: Cork University Press, 2015, xii + 390 pp.

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Preface to The Great Irish Famine: Global Contexts

Author: Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen) and Jason King (Irish Heritage Trust)

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This special issue of Breac examines “The Great Irish Famine: Global Contexts.” It brings together leading experts in the field with support from the International Network of Irish Famine Studies. The network was established in 2014 with funding from the Dutch research council NWO (project number 236-69-007). The special issue builds on recent studies such as Marguérite Corporaal and Jason King’s Irish Global Migration and Memory: Transnational Perspectives of Ireland’s Famine Exodus

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Migration, Mobility, and Murder: The Story of the 1,490 Assisted Immigrants, from the Mahon Estate, Strokestown, County Roscommon, 1847

Author: Mark G. McGowan (University of Toronto)

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The[1] series of events that played out near Queenston, Niagara, in the spring and summer of 1848 read like a Stephen King novel. On May 18, while playing along the banks of the Niagara River, a group of boys discovered the body of a man who had been bludgeoned to death. The local constabulary later identified the deceased man as Patrick O’Connor, a recent immigrant from Ireland, who, with his wife and son, had gone missing from the Queenston area almost two weeks before. Ten days after the discovery of O’Connor’s corpse, locals discovered the badly decomposed remains of a woman, not far from where the first body had been found. Witnesses described the body as “destitute of clothing” and in “an advanced state of decomposition,” but upon closer investigation the local authorities identified the unfortunate victim as Mary O’Connor, wife of the aforementioned Patrick. Based on the testimony of local Irish settlers and the discovery of a badly injured John O’Connor, six-year-old son of the deceased, Toronto police arrested Thomas Brennan, another Irish immigrant who hailed from the same estate from which the O’Connors had ventured.[2]

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An Inhospitable Welcome? Emigration to the Cape of Good Hope during the Great Irish Famine

Author: Ciarán Reilly (Maynooth University)

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They are crying out at Natal, at the Cape, and at Port Philip for the labour which is useless, redundant and lethargic at Ballina and Glenties. It would be a long delayed mercy to Ireland and the colonies to let them have it.[1]
 

The Cape Colony, now modern South Africa, did not attract large numbers of emigrants from Ireland during the Famine years, perhaps as few as five thousand people.[2]

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Remembering and Commemorating the Great Famine and Emigration to Australia

Author: Perry McIntyre (University of New South Wales)

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Between 1788 and 1868, one hundred and sixty-one thousand men and women were transported to the Australian colonies; thirty-five percent of them were Irish and more than thirty thousand arrived in New South Wales. At least a third of the Irish convicts left wives and families behind, most with no means of support. A scheme to provide free passages to families of well-behaved transported men brought these abandoned families to the colonies of New South Wales and Van Diemen’s Land (modern Tasmania), many during the Famine and its aftermath. While these Irish convicts and their families actively negotiated favorable outcomes which fitted into the British and colonial government’s objectives for the developing free settlements, other emigration schemes also brought free passengers to Australia. One assisted immigration scheme particularly relevant to the Famine brought 4,114 single teenage women from workhouses in every county during 1848 to 1850. For Irish people, these emigration schemes were one way that some Famine survivors were able to flee their devastated homeland. This paper examines some of the processes involved in emigration to Australia in the 1840s and the immediate post-Famine years, and provides a few examples of the personal experiences of these people in Australia and Ireland. It also looks at how Ireland and Australia have remembered the Famine and its Pacific exodus well into the twenty-first century.

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Reimagining Rural Ireland: Famine, Migration, and Feudalism in Irish and Irish North American Fiction, 1860–1895

Author: Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen), Christopher Cusack (Radboud University Nijmegen), and Lindsay Janssen (University College Dublin)

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“There is a lingering spark of the old feudalism yet left in the people. Try and kindle it up once more into the old healthful glow of love to the landlord.”[1] These lines, written by Mary Martin to her uncle, a notorious absentee landlord, urge Captain Martin to come back to his estate, as the tenants are severely stricken by fever and famine. While set around 1830, Charles Lever’s novel The Martins of Cro’ Martin

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